Free Online Classes for Musicians

Continued professional development is important in any field. In the past few years, I have been expanding my professional development experience to beyond the annual teacher or musician conference I would attend. One valuable resource I have learned to tap is the world of Massive Open Online Courses. These are online courses open to the public, typically with thousands of enrollees.

I am a big fan of coursera.org. This site currently aggregates over 400 mini-courses (typically 5-6 weeks long) presented by respected universities and colleges across the world. There are more than a handful of courses related to music that I have on my watch list for future participation.

Reference for Guitar Chords on the Staff

Reference for Guitar Chords on the Staff

This week, one of my tasks is to edit the guitar part for Impulso: Concerto for Marimba, Flamenco Guitar, and Dancer, a collaborative project with Chris Burton-Jacome.  Chris is a fabulous flamenco guitarist living in Phoenix. Chris, his wife Lena, and my wife Maria will be performing the concerto in St. Louis and in Phoenix in November.

I was finding it time consuming to figure out what notes to write on the staff for the strummed chords until I started noticing patterns.  For most barred chords, there seem to be only a handful of voicings that are used.  I searched the web for a reference sheet that would show these voicings on a staff, but I didn’t find what I needed.  So, I took some time to make up a reference sheet to help me translate what I had originally written for the guitar part into something that was playable.

Mini-Sabbatical Month!

Mini-Sabbatical Month!

Several years ago, fellow piano teacher and performer Christina Cuda Robertson took 6 months off of teaching for what she called her sabbatical. During this time, she maintained a tremendously reduced teaching schedule, where students only scheduled lessons every two weeks or so if and only if they had completely prepared everything assigned from the previous lesson.

Within her sabbatical, Christina learned new music, attended workshops, and focussed on personal musical growth. I remember feeling quite envious of her ability to plan ahead for such a valuable experience, and I was quite confident that I would never be able to make room for a personal sabbatical as long as I still had children to feed and educate.

Practicing Functional Harmony with Dice

Practicing Functional Harmony with Dice

I have been experimenting with ways to give my students a more thorough understanding of functional harmony.  The deeper the student’s understanding of harmony , the easier it is to learn and memorize music.  Even something as simple as knowing that a V chord usually moves to I can help a student remember what harmony follows, identify new tonal areas, and understand phrase structure.

My newest experiment involves using dice to have students construct viable harmonic motion and then play it on the piano. So far, I’ve just started playing with the concept with my students who have a more advanced understanding of harmony, but I’m excited enough about the possibilities with all my students to write about this now.